Rambler - Rambler American Coupe 1958
Rambler American.
2 deurs coupe
De ultieme amerikaan.
Zuinig.
Compact.
Eigen vorm.
Unibody systeem.
Compleet
loopt
rijdt remt
Gave body.
net interieur.
6 cil zijklepmotor
Europeese toelating.
1958
American Motors' designers gave the car a new grille and more open rear fender wells, giving the car a lighter appearance than that of the earlier car, which had hidden its rear wheels behind deeply skirted fenders. The original taillights were turned upside down, saving money on retooling.[5] This design was originally mandated by Nash's Airflyte styling motif, which sought to reach for the blinding optimism of post-World War II transportation.[6] The car's seemingly narrow 55-inch (1,397 mm) track was not much different from the industry standard, but rather an illusion fostered by the bulbous bodywork.[6]

Romney worried about cannibalizing sales of his larger, more profitable senior Ramblers, so for 1958, the American was available only as a two-door sedan (senior Ramblers came only in a variety of 4-door body styles.)[7] The only engine was a 195.6 cu in (3.2 L) flathead six producing 90 hp (67 kW; 91 PS). The American went on sale late January 1958, with a minimum of marketing and promotion. It was available in two trims, a base Deluxe model priced at US$1,789 allowing AMC to claim the lowest-priced car made in America (adjusted only for inflation, equal to US$15,175 in 2017 dollars[8]) and as a Super trim version for $1,874 offering more "luxuries".[9] The car was advertised as being the only small car with an automatic transmission.[10] All Americans were completely dipped in rust proofing.[10]

The automotive press was positive to the reintroduced model. Tom McCahill wrote in Mechanix Illustrated, "There isn't a better buy in the world today." He continued, "The Rambler American ... is an ideal-size small family car... It will give up to 30 miles on a gallon of gas (and more, with overdrive) and will outperform any imported sedan selling for under $2,000 except in the cornering department... It is by far the most rattle-and-squeak-free 1958 Detroit product I've driven-and I've driven them all!"[11]

Reports by owners praised the car's economy of operation, but ranked at the top its ease of handling.[12] A "workhorse" priced at under $2,000 "it doesn't look as though every penny was pinched out of it", but retains a "chic look".[12] The American found 30,640 buyers during the abbreviated 1958 model year and helped Rambler become the only domestic make to post an increase in sales that year.[11]
€ 6750